Top Tiql Tips: your weekly market guide (8th to 12th Jan)

Here’s to a new year of trading in 2018

To help you to earn more with TIQL we’re sending you this free guide to the markets and highlighting some dates to watch this week. Economic news and announcements cause financial markets to move a lot, and may provide some opportunities to trade.

Remember, you can earn some extra cash by inviting people to trade with TIQL. The very first time someone you invite makes a deposit of $5 of more, you will receive $1. Whoever you invite also gets $1 USD to trade with; you can’t get better than that! You can keep earning as we pay you a percentage every time your supporters trade with TIQL.
USD: PPI & CPI
The Producer Price Index (PPI) (Thursday 11th January 1.30pm GMT) has been stable at 0.4% for three months. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) (Friday 12th January 1.30pm GMT) has been rather more volatile with no clear trend for many years.

Both data impact how the markets view USD because of their connection to the domestic economy, which is the key factor in USD value. PPI impacts inflation and it’s interesting to note recent news, according to the FT, that market investors are currently choosing funds that protect against inflation. The target rate of 2% inflation is close to how things stand so the forecast seems reasonably steady for Federal Reserve Bank’s new Chair, Powell, when he starts next month.

We are sure Powell will be keeping a close eye on the less-predictable CPI due the Reserve Bank’s mandate to contain inflation. A low figure this week will probably be seen by most as a good result.

Oil: politics affects prices
This week Crude Oil Inventories (Wednesday 10th January 3.30pm GMT) is likely to see another drop but what that does to USD remains to be seen.

In 2017 OPEC worked hard to manipulate the price of oil by agreeing to reduce production levels. Other like-minded oil producers, such as Russia, joined them. Stock levels were high for a long time and prices didn’t recover as well as they’d have liked leading to a change in how things work in Saudi Arabia. This hit the news last week as 11 Saudi princes were arrested for demonstrating against their newly imposed utility bills. Life is so hard as a modern Middle East prince. So hard.

There are mixed views on whether oil production overall will rise this year and that is a determining factor in price. To ensure its arms sales to the Middle East go smoothly, Russia is unlikely to renege on its deal with OPEC. Other oil-producing countries face war, poor infrastructure and natural declines in production leading some to declare supplies will fall and prices will increase.

On the other hand, the US has not been working with OPEC to reduce output and shale production is on the rise boosting US oil inventories. Trump’s America First policy means it is likely to push forward with production and that could keep prices low. This would be good news for US domestic gas guzzlers as well as manufacturers in the heartland of Trump’s power base. In an election year, he is sure to have this in mind.

GBP: Manufacturing Production monthly
Post-Brexit Britain has been on a bumpy economic ride. Confusion over what Brexit actually means and posturing in the EU negotiations has resulted in nervous markets. While UK unemployment is at its lowest for 40 years, productivity appears so subdued that the Bank of England raised rates in November for the first time in a decade.

It would be fair to say that the UK has been the slowest to recover from the crash of 2008 of all the advanced economies. This week Manufacturing Production monthly (Wednesday 10th January 9.30am GMT) will shed light on progress. If the Brits start making more and selling more both domestically and internationally, some of those jitters might calm down. And for the last 3 months manufacturing production has been rising nicely. Maybe the EU market isn’t such a big deal?

Only joking – news that broke on 7th January 2018 suggested UK importers may face massive increases in upfront cost increases. And it’s a shame then that analysts saw December’s Manufacturing Production monthly figure of 0.7% as something of a peak. They reckon it is going to fall back to as low as 0.1%. Let’s be positive – at least it is in the black. But if they’re right or if it’s even worse than that, markets really won’t like it. Manufacturing Production makes up about 80% of total industrial production and it’s quick to react to consumer conditions. All in all, GBP is starting 2018 on the back foot.

Here are the main news events to look out for this week:​

  • Mon Jan 08
    • 15:30:00 GMT CAD BOC Business Outlook Survey
  • Wed Jan 10
    • 09:30:00 GMT GBP Manufacturing Production m/m
    • 15:30:00 GMT USD Crude Oil Inventories
  • Thu Jan 11
    • 00:30:00 GMT AUD Retail Sales m/m
    • 13:30:00 GMT USD PPI m/m
  • Fri Jan 12
    • 13:30:00 GMT USD Core CPI m/m
    • 13:30:00 GMT USD CPI m/m
    • 13:30:00 GMT USD Retail Sales m/m
    • 13:30:00 GMT USD Core Retail Sales m/m

Some Markets to Watch…

BTCUSD: Bitcoin almost reached the $20,000 level before falling off dramatically before the end of the year. Right now we are ping-ponging in a range between $13,000 and $17,000. Any breaks below the $13,000 support and $12,000 and $11,000 has attracted buyers before.

USDJPY: This pair has been moving in a range now for some time. We have resistance at 113.75 and significant previous demand at 1114.50. 112 is supporting with the 200 simple moving average close by.

Crude Oil: Looking at the weekly and we can can there may be some supply near $63. We might see some tactical shorting here but this looks bullish above $60.

EURUSD: we have come off of the highs with sellers coming in at the August highs. A retracement to the halfway back and previous demand may see this pair pull back to 118 before retesting the highs.

GBPUSD: Cable is still technically in a channel making higher highs and higher lows. There could be some unfinished business at 1.38 on this pair, which was the support level dramatically broken on the Brexit vote. If you’d been long on this pair for a while, it might be a level to cover. The bears might be eyeing this level as well as a point of interest for a short play.​

Gold: Gold bugs will be bullish on this market above 1300. We have moved back into the channel again and the recent highs of 1357 could be retested. Below 1300, this starts to look bearish and we may start to see a deeper correction.

Whichever way you think these markets are going to go, you can trade these and other markets from as little as 1 cent with TIQL.

Markets can really move during news events; all TIQL trades come with guaranteed stops to always protect you from losing more than you have invested in a trade.

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USD: PPI and CPI monthly

Steady or not, here I come

The East Coast has been in a deep freeze that even a good week on the markets won’t thaw. The Producer Price Index (PPI), due out on Thursday 11th January at 1.30pm GMT, has been steady at 0.4% since October’s data. The Consumer Price Index (CPI), due out on Friday 12th January at 1.30pm GMT, has been rather more volatile with no clear trend for many years.

Both data impact how the markets view USD because of their connection to the domestic economy, the biggest driver of USD value. PPI impacts inflation and it’s interesting to note recent news, according to the FT, that market investors are currently choosing funds that protect against inflation. The target rate of 2% is close to the truth as things stand so things seem steady for Federal Reserve Bank’s new Chair, Powell, when he starts next month.

Powell will be keeping a close eye on the less-predictable CPI due the Reserve Bank’s mandate to contain inflation. A low figure this week will probably be seen by most as a good result.